Dating scan

This first routine scan is carried out for the following reasons:. It is not diagnostic. We also like to arrange this for around 12 weeks, but it can be performed between 10 and 14 weeks. Occasionally during the scan, a miscarriage might be diagnosed even though you might still ‘feel pregnant’. This first routine scan is carried out for the following reasons: to confirm when the baby is due: the early scan helps us to work out the date when your baby is due. We might suggest a different date from that indicated by your last period. This is because not all pregnancies are conceived exactly 14 days after the first day of the last period. If your pregnancy is the result of assisted conception, we would normally calculate the delivery date from the date of your treatment.

Your Pregnancy Journey

Log in Sign up. Community groups. Home Pregnancy Health Antenatal scans. In this article When will I have my dating scan? How accurate are dating scans?

Please use the NHS Inform website for up to date guidance and advice on If you have a planned scan appointment in the coming days then please do not.

If you attend without a suitable face covering single-use masks are available to buy at the time of your appointment, subject to availability. Private ultrasound dating scan sometimes called 12 week scan or booking scan. We recommend that you present your dating scan results to your usual healthcare professional whose contact details we take at the time of booking. Your choice of a free rescan may be appropriate if we are unable to perform the primary purpose of this scan.

All scans are performed by a qualified Sonographer with diagnostic obstetric scanning experience. Determination of fetal gestation, dating of pregnancy, single or multiple pregnancy confirmation using ultrasound between 12 — 16 weeks gestation, no sexing.

NHS and private ultrasound scans during pregnancy

An ultrasound scan that helps the NHS confirm how many weeks pregnant you are, checks how your baby is developing – and gives you an amazing black and white photo to take home By Rachel Mostyn. They will also check that anatomically everything is where should be. Then you get your amazing pictures and you can tell the world!

As part of the NHS pregnancy care program you will be given two free scans Find out why the dating scan is carried out, why your due date might change, and​.

We use cookies to allow us and selected partners to improve your experience and our advertising. By continuing to browse you consent to our use of cookies. You can understand more and change your cookies preferences here. From early pregnancy to the anomaly scan, ultrasounds check that your baby is developing as it should be. We look at the routine scans you can expect on the NHS and what additional options are available privately.

Our Test Labs compare features and prices on a range of products. Try Which? You’ll instantly be able to compare our test scores, so you can make sure you don’t get stuck with a Don’t Buy. When you go for a pregnancy scan, the sonographer a specialist trained in ultrasound scans puts ultrasound gel on your tummy and then moves a handheld probe across your skin. While the gel might be a bit cold, the scans are completely painless.

The probe sends out ultrasound waves — sound waves with a frequency higher than the human ear is able to hear — to produce images of your baby, which the sonographer studies on a screen.

Your screening choices

Direct contact with the midwives can result in earlier access to health information and screening that can help the health and wellbeing of both mum and baby. This can help to reduce potential complications by making sure mums get the advice they need to give their babies the best start in life. An answer phone service is in place where you can leave your details.

Once we have your details we aim to contact you within 2 working days, at busy times this may take us a little longer.

You are welcome to bring someone with you when you come for your scan. Further scans are only arranged if there is a clinical need—your doctor or midwife will.

Back to Your pregnancy and baby guide. Ultrasound scans use sound waves to build a picture of the baby in the womb. The scans are painless, have no known side effects on mothers or babies, and can be carried out at any stage of pregnancy. Talk to your midwife, GP or obstetrician about any concerns you have. For many women, ultrasound scans are the highlight of pregnancy.

It’s very exciting to “see” your baby in the womb, often moving their hands and legs. Having a scan in pregnancy is usually a happy event, but be aware that ultrasound scans may detect some serious health conditions, so try to be prepared for that information. See What if a screening test finds something for more information on what may happen if a scan or other screening test suggests your baby may be more likely to have a condition.

They will advise you about what to do. Find out more about pregnancy and coronavirus. Most scans are carried out by specially trained staff called sonographers. The scan is carried out in a dimly lit room so the sonographer is able to get good images of your baby. First you’ll be asked to lie on a couch. You’ll then be asked to lower your skirt or trousers to your hips and raise your top to your chest.

Screening tests during pregnancy

If you plan to give birth at home, contact your midwife to discuss your options. Giving birth in our hospitals At present women on low risk pathways who are not suspected or confirmed to have coronavirus can still choose to have a water birth in our birth centres or on our labour wards. We are currently still able to perform planned and emergency caesarean sections but would like to inform women who are booked with us that we may need to change the date of any planned procedure depending on staff availability.

Once you’ve discovered that you are pregnant, it’s important to get health The first is usually around eight to 12 weeks and is sometimes called the dating scan, If you are carrying more than one baby, you will need more ultrasound scans.

Throughout your pregnancy, you will be offered a number of screening tests to check the health of you and your baby. It is your choice whether you want to have the tests and your community midwife will be able to answer any questions or concerns you have before you make a decision. During your first appointment with the midwife, we will ask your permission to take a blood and urine sample for routine screening.

This is so that we can check your blood group and also test for a variety of conditions including:. You are welcome to bring someone with you when you come for your scan. Further scans are only arranged if there is a clinical need, either the doctor or midwife will explain if this should occur. The screening tests provide information about the chance of a baby with these conditions. These tests use blood samples taken from the mother and measurements taken from ultrasound scans, to work out this chance.

The test you will be offered depends on how many weeks pregnant you are. This will either be a combined screening test or a quadruple test. If you do receive a higher risk result from a screening test, your midwife or doctor will give you further information and support. Further information is available from the Screening Tests for You and Your Baby leaflet and the Trust information leaflets.

It is important that you read this leaflet and discuss these screening tests with your midwife or obstetrician.

Your Guide to NHS Pregnancy Ultrasound Scans

Skip to content. Once you’ve discovered that you are pregnant, it’s important to get health advice to help make your pregnancy as safe and comfortable as possible. Guidance for pregnant women and information on what is happening in their regional unit during the coronavirus COVID outbreak can be found on NI Maternity. Routine check-ups are usually carried out or organised by your midwife or doctor and will continue throughout the pregnancy.

During pregnancy, you will be offered a number of blood tests that provide information that helps you deliver a healthy baby.

Perhaps you are uncertain of your dates or simply cannot wait until your NHS 12 week scan. Whatever the reason, an early dating scan can give you peace of.

Back to Your pregnancy and baby guide. All pregnant women in England are offered an ultrasound scan at around 8 to 14 weeks of pregnancy. This is called the dating scan. It’s used to see how far along in your pregnancy you are and check your baby’s development. Your midwife or doctor will book you a dating scan appointment. It will usually take place at your local hospital ultrasound department. The person performing the scan is called a sonographer.

You may need to have a full bladder for this scan, as this makes the ultrasound image clearer. You can ask your midwife or doctor before the scan if this is the case.

Publication

Book now What is your due date? Perhaps you are uncertain of your dates or simply cannot wait until your NHS 12 week scan. A scan can also help you bond with your baby and help you to relax and start enjoying being pregnant. This scan can be carried out from 6 weeks to 18 weeks.

If you have a new continuous cough, a high temperature, or a loss or change to Ultrasound scans are available at both the John Radcliffe (JR) Hospital and the ‘crown to rump’ length of the embryo, to accurately date the pregnancy. We will tell you which pathway you are on and what this means for your pregnancy.

The browser you are using is too old for our website. Please visit www. Your first pregnancy scan can be an exciting yet nerve-wracking experience. Learn about why scans are offered, and what to expect during a typical ultrasound scan. Discover the science behind your baby’s developments, week-by-week. An ultrasound scan bounces sound waves back and forth to build up a simple black and white picture of your baby as it grows in the womb.

As part of the NHS pregnancy care program you will be given two free scans during your pregnancy. The first scan, is between your 8th and 14th week of pregnancy, typically around 12 weeks. The second pregnancy scan is anytime between your 18th and 21st week typically around 20 weeks. Scans are strongly recommended to monitor the progress of your baby in the womb but they are not compulsory.

Find out why the dating scan is carried out, why your due date might change, and get tips to help you prepare for your appointment. Learn more about the purpose of your 20 week scan. Find out about learning your baby’s gender and which conditions your sonographer will be looking for. If you are experiencing pain or bleeding, have had a previous miscarriage or an ectopic pregnancy, you may be invited to have an early scan between six and ten weeks.

Early pregnancy scan

Skip to content. Skip to navigation. This appointment is a good opportunity for you to ask any questions and normally takes about an hour. Your GP should listen to your heart and lungs as part of your fitness assessment. Your midwife will provide health information on a number of topics to help you have a healthy pregnancy and prepare yourself for birth. We will ask your permission at your booking appointment to take some blood samples for routine screening.

It gives you the opportunity to see some visual evidence of your pregnancy This is particularly important for women who do not know the date of their last Sadly, approximately 3% of women who attend for an early pregnancy scan will find.

It is important that you see a Midwife as early as possible in your pregnancy. Women have their first and longest Antenatal appointment between 6 – 12 weeks of pregnancy with their Midwife. This is called a “booking” visit and involves questions about your health, any illnesses or previous pregnancies. This helps us to see if there may be any possible problems during your pregnancy and allows us to tailor your Antenatal care for your specific needs.

At the start of your pregnancy, during your booking visit, your Midwife will make an assessment based on your previous and current medical and pregnancy history. If you have not had any problems, then the Midwife will state that you are low risk and will be suitable for Midwifery-led care. This means that you will have all of your Antenatal care provided by the Midwife, and you will only need to attend the hospital for routine scan appointments.

You will not see an Obstetrician unless a problem arises. During your pregnancy we will continuously assess you and your baby to ensure that we provide the appropriate care for you and your baby. At or around 36 weeks the Midwife will discuss your birth plan with you and complete a Risk Assessment to check that your pregnancy has been uneventful. If you and the Midwife are happy, then they will state that you are low risk and will give you the contact details for the Midwifery-led Unit to call when you are in labour.

If all is well you will stay low risk. If you remain on the high risk pathway you may be seen more often at the hospital Antenatal Clinic where your care will be shared between your Obstetrician, specialist teams and Community Midwife.

Your pregnancy – What to expect

We provide a range of community services in Harrogate and the local area as well as across North Yorkshire and Leeds. At your initial booking appointment, you will be offered a range of important tests to screen for certain conditions that may affect your pregnancy. It is important for you to be aware that ultrasound scanning is a form of screening and is done to perform important checks on the health and development of your baby.

The combined test involves a blood test and a nuchal translucency NT ultrasound scan in the first trimester of pregnancy, normally at 12 weeks. For more information about screening, please speak to your community midwife or our screening co-ordinator on or

Your midwife will request your first scan and an appointment letter will be sent to you. Screening test for you and your baby patient leaflet – link below Measure baby from head to bottom to “date” the pregnancy and determine a due date. Northampton General Hospital NHS Trust Privacy Notice | Social Media.

The scan may also show if you are expecting a baby girl or boy. The hospital will not offer you another scan if this is the case. The person performing the scan is called a sonographer. The sonographer will put gel onto your tummy to start the examination. The gel usually feels cold and you may feel a little discomfort when the ultrasound probe transducer presses on your tummy.

An ultrasound scan takes approximately 10 minutes to complete. A screen will be visible for you to also see what the sonographer is looking at. It is advised you have a full bladder, when having a scan.

What happens at your booking appointment


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